Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz

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on 18 Sep, 16:41

Public Symposium on Infrastructure & Conservation

Public Symposium on Infrastructure & Conservation
Upcoming Event
Hilton Hotel

On behalf of Professor William F. Laurance and the team at the Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science (TESS), James Cook University, Cairns, Australia, you are invited to attend the Public Symposium on “Infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific: Promoting Benefits and Limiting Environmental Risks” to be held at the Hilton Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on the 5th of October (full day), registrations are free but essential and catering is included during the event.

The TESS team are working with multiple government departments, relevant non-governmental organisations, and many other stakeholders in the Asia-Pacific region, to incorporate strategic planning of new roads and infrastructure development. Their work aims to ensure future road infrastructure maximises socio-economic opportunities for communities whilst minimising the detrimental environmental impacts that often accompany infrastructure development.

Besides a Keynote by Professor Bill Laurance there will be talks by Dr Reuben Clements (Rimba), Dr g. Balamurugan (ERE Group), myself, and other guest speakers.

If you wish to join us for this completely free event, please register now at http://www.global-roadmap.org/infra-ap-2017/

on 14 Mar, 05:54

Sustainable Development: the Malaysian Challenge and Way Forward

Sustainable Development: the Malaysian Challenge and Way Forward
Past Event
22 Mar
18:00 - 20:00
Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre (KLTC) Chulan Tower, at Royal Chulan Hotel

Invitation to 2017’s SRN seminar on ‘Sustainable Development: the Malaysian Challenge and Way Forward’, that will take place on Wed 22nd March, at 6 pm, at KLTC (L2 Chuan Tower, KL). The seminar will include talks by three distinguished speakers – Dr Zeeda Fatimah (UM), Mr Randolph Jeremiah (ERE Group), and Mr Rashyid Redza (Sime Darby).

This is a student-led and -organized event.

Please do find details below and in the attached flyer. For more information, please contact Joon Yee Yong at khyy5yjy(at)nottingham.edu.my.

Download (PDF, 415KB)

on 2 Aug, 12:27

MEME Updates 12, summer 2016 – Stories about elephants from Malaysia

MEME Updates 12, summer 2016 – Stories about elephants from Malaysia
Post

Source: https://issuu.com/ahimsa/docs/meme.updates.n12.hr/1

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on 8 Sep, 00:06

A Murder Mystery Wildlife Conservation Course in Malaysia

A Murder Mystery Wildlife Conservation Course in Malaysia
Post Volunteer!

Who Murdered the Malayan Tiger? Join us for this experiential course in Malaysia where you will learn a multitude of skills in Wildlife Conservation to solve this Murder Mystery. Using a combination of novel teaching approaches as such gaming, role-play and onling learning, this course will immerse you in roles and tasks to apply current research tools, assimilate up-to-date concepts and hone communication skills in conservation biology. Solve the mystery before its too late!

Please refer to the posters for more details on application process and topics taught.

For more information on tutors, please refer to:

Dr. Cedric Tan: http://www.wildcru.org/members/dr-cedric-kai-wei-tan/

Dr. Lucy Tallents: http://www.wildcru.org/members/dr-lucy-tallents/

Prof. Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz: http://www.meme-elephants.org/ahimsa_campos_arceiz.html

 

WCC poster Murder Mystery

 

WCC poster Murder Mystery 2

on 12 Sep, 02:33

Book Launch – The Ecology of Tropical East Asia, Second Edition. By Richard Corlett

Book Launch – The Ecology of Tropical East Asia, Second Edition. By Richard Corlett
Past Event
8 Oct
18:00 - 19:30
Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre (KLTC) Chulan Tower, at Royal Chulan Hotel

About the Book

Tropical East Asia is home to over one billion people and faces massive human impacts from its rising population and rapid economic growth. It has already lost more than two-thirds of its forest cover and has the highest rates of deforestation and logging in the tropics. Hunting, coupled with the relentless trade in wildlife products, threatens all its large and many of its smaller vertebrates. Despite these problems, the region still supports an estimated 15-25% of global terrestrial biodiversity and is therefore a key area for conservation.

Effective conservation action depends on a clear understanding of the ecological patterns and processes in the region. The patterns we observe today are a product of the region’s long and complex history, from the tectonic origins of the modern land masses, through the changing climates and sea-levels of the past two million years, to the arrival of modern humans, the spread of agriculture, and the recent rapid urbanization. The last few decades have seen an acceleration in the human domination of the region, with no substantial area unaffected.

The environmental changes expected over the next few decades will have no analogues in the past so their impacts are hard to predict. By 2050, global climate change will have produced regional climates that have not occurred anywhere on Earth for tens of millions of years.  These changes will interact with others, including increased fragmentation of natural habitats, nutrient enrichment of ecosystems, declines in native species, and proliferation of invasive species. A biodiverse future is still possible, but it will happen only by design, not by default.

About the Author

Richard Corlett obtained his first degree from the University of Cambridge in 1974, followed by a PhD in plant ecology at the Australian National University, with fieldwork in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. He has subsequently held teaching posts at the University of Chiang Mai (1980-82), National University of Singapore (1982-87, 2008-2012), and the University of Hong Kong (1988-2008). In 2012 he moved to the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, in Yunnan, to take charge of a new Center for Integrative Conservation. His major research interests include terrestrial ecology and biodiversity conservation in tropical East Asia, plant-animal interactions, urban ecology, invasive species, and the impacts of climate change. In addition to numerous scientific papers, he is the author or co-author of several books, including The Ecology of Tropical East Asia, first published in 2009 by Oxford University Press, and Tropical Rain Forests: an Ecological and Biogeographical Comparison, co-authored with Richard Primack.

on 5 Aug, 23:31

Seminar – Challenging Received Wisdom: Political Ecology and a case study of ‘Bedouin Overgrazing’ in South Sinai

Seminar – Challenging Received Wisdom: Political Ecology and a case study of ‘Bedouin Overgrazing’ in  South Sinai
Past Event
7 Aug
15:00 - 16:00
The University of Nottingham Malaysia
Challenging Received Wisdom: Political Ecology and a case study of ‘Bedouin Overgrazing’ in  South Sinai

Challenging Received Wisdom: Political Ecology and a case study of ‘Bedouin Overgrazing’ in South Sinai

Welcome to MESYM!
Connecting the green dots

MESYM.com is a crowd-sourced platform and a living database for environmental movements in Malaysia. There are many good actions being done out there. Our goal is to bring them together. We connect the green dots.