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on 21 Feb, 12:50
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Mindset-UNMC

[Mindset Public Talk] Dr Martin Mahony – Science, politics and culture in the Anthropocene

It is our pleasure to announce March’s Mindset Public Talk – Is this ‘the age of humans’? Science, politics and culture in the Anthropocene, by Dr Martin Mahony, Research Fellow at the School of Geography of the University of Nottingham, UK Campus. In this talk, Dr Mahony will introduce how social scientists and humanities scholars have been approaching the idea of the Anthropocene, the ‘age of humans’ geological epoch. More details below and in the attached flyer.

This event is one of Mindset’s Public Talks – monthly events that are generally held on the evening of the third Wednesday of each month. These talks are aimed to a general audience including academics, government officers, NGOs, people from the relevant industries, and any person with an interest for environmental issues. We are looking forward to see you in this and future Mindset events.

Please do join us and share this information with others who might be interested.


Mindset Public Talk, March 2017

Title: Is this ‘the age of humans’? Science, politics and culture in the Anthropocene
Guest Speaker: Dr Martin Mahony
Date & time: Wed 15 Mar 2017, 6-7:30 pm
Venue: University of Nottingham Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre (KLTC), Level 2, Chulan Tower, No 3 Jalan Conlay, Kuala Lumpur (GPS: 3.149604, 101.716449)Organizer: Mindset, UNMC Interdisciplinary Centre for Environmental Studies
RSVP: Tue 7th Mar, Praveena.Chackrapani@nottingham.edu.my

Refreshments will be served after the talk

Transport from and back to UNMC will be provided for students who register before Tue 7th Mar [To avoid traffic hassle we encourage using public transport. The nearest stations to KLTC are Monorail’s Raja Chulan (11 min walking) and Bukit Bintang (13 min)]

About the Talk

A group of scientists responsible for splicing up geological time into distinct eras recently recommended that the ‘Anthropocene’ be officially adopted as a new geological epoch. This ‘age of humans’ is one which is defined by massive human impacts on the natural environment, to a point where that impact is actually visible in the geological record. 

The public debate about the Anthropocene has understandably been dominated by scientific voices debating the extent and timing of this human impact. But the concept also raises vital questions about how we understand the relationships between science, culture, politics, and environmental change, and more broadly of how we conceive of the human place in the world. This talk will introduce how social scientists and humanities scholars have been approaching the idea of the Anthropocene. While some see the concept as a useful challenge to conventional nature/culture distinctions, others see the whole idea of the Anthropocene as just another self-indulgent way of understanding our power and our subordination of nature. Others simply question who this ‘anthropos’ is that everybody’s talking about – aren’t some humans more responsible for the onset of the Anthropocene than others? The debate about the Anthropocene therefore provides an opportunity to reflect anew on how societies understand their relationships to each other and to nature, as well as to reflect on the complex relationships between science, politics and culture.

About the Speaker

Dr Martin Mahony is a Research Fellow in the Cultural & Historical Geography research group in the School of Geography, University of Nottingham, UK. He works on the intersections of environment, science and society, with a particular focus on the cultural politics of climate, the history of the atmospheric sciences, and the science-policy interface. His current research interests include the historical geographies of science, empire and climate in the British colonial world.

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#mindset #anthropocene

on 2 Feb, 19:51
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Mindset-UNMC

[Mindset Public Talk] Prof Nathalie Dubois, Dr Keely Mills, Dr Suzanne McGowan – Aquatic Transitions: Understanding the Anthropocene using lake sediment records, Thu 16 Feb, 6pm, KLTC

It’s our pleasure to announce that we will have three guest speakers for the Mindset Public Talk in February. Prof Nathalie Dubois (EAWAG, Switzerland), Dr Keely Mills (British Geological Survey) and Dr Suzanne McGowan (University of Nottingham, UK) will talk to us about ‘Aquatic Transitions: Understanding the Anthropocene using lake sediment records’. The speakers are visiting Malaysia for, and this event forms part of, an international workshop run by the Aquatic Transitions Working Group of PAGES (Past Global Changes).

This is a very nice opportunity to explore how humans in Malaysia and elsewhere have impacted the environment over the sweep of time to the present, and the related idea of the ‘Anthropocene’. More details are below and in the attached flyer.

This event is one of Mindset’s Public Talks – monthly events that are generally held in the third week of each month. Please note that, unusually, February’s talk will be on a Thursday evening. These talks are aimed to a general audience including academics, government officers, NGOs, people from the relevant industries, and any person with an interest for environmental issues. We look forward to seeing you at this and future Mindset events.

Please do join us and share this information with others who might be interested.

 

Mindset Public Talk, February 2017

Title: Aquatic Transitions: Understanding the Anthropocene using lake sediment records

Guest Speakers: Prof Nathalie Dubois (EAWAG, Switzerland), Dr Keely Mills (British Geological Survey), Dr Suzanne McGowan (University of Nottingham, UK)

Date & time: Thu 16 Feb 2017, 6-7:30 pm

Venue: University of Nottingham Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre (KLTC), Level 2, Chulan Tower, No 3 Jalan Conlay, Kuala Lumpur (GPS: 3.149604, 101.716449)

Organizers: Mindset, UNMC Interdisciplinary Centre for Environmental Studies & the Aquatic Transitions Working Group funded by PAGES

RSVP: Mon 13 Feb, Praveena.Chackrapani@nottingham.edu.my

Refreshments will be served after the talk

Transport from and back to UNMC will be provided for students who register before Fri 10 Feb

[To avoid traffic hassle we encourage using public transport. The nearest stations to KLTC are Monorail’s Raja Chulan (11 min walking) and Bukit Bintang (13 min)]

 

About the Talk

Freshwater resources provide many crucial ecosystem services, and yet they are threatened by human impacts such as toxic pollution, nutrient enrichment, exotic species introductions and excessive soil erosion which have escalated during the ‘Anthropocene’. Sustainable freshwater management requires rigorous understanding of how human impacts influence aquatic ecosystems. In this lecture, three experts will explain how paleolimnologists unlock the secrets of lake sediments to interpret past changes. The second part of the lecture will explore how such techniques have been applied in northwest Europe to document human impacts over thousands of years. Finally, the lecture will present new research on sediment cores from the iconic Malaysian lake Tasik Chini to explore how environmental changes associated with land use conversion, mining and damming have changed the ecology of this unique flood pulse wetland.

About the Speakers

This public lecture is part of a workshop run by the Aquatic Transitions Working Group funded by PAGES (Past Global Changes). More information about this initiative can be accessed at http://pastglobalchanges.org/ini/wg/aquatic-transitions/intro

#mindset #anthropocene

mindset-feb-2017

on 30 Nov, 19:37
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Mindset-UNMC

[Mindset Public Talk] Dr Benoit Goossens – wildlife habitat fragmentation in the Kinabatangan

It’s our pleasure to announce that Dr Benoit Goossens will be our guest for December’s Mindset Public Talk. Dr Benoit Goossens is the Director of the Danau Girang Field Centre in Sabah and he will talk to us about ‘Wildlife responses to habitat fragmentation and degradation in the Kinabatangan landscape’. Dr Benoit and his team are doing outstanding wildlife research on species such as Bornean elephants, banteng, sun bear, clouded leopard, Malay civet, Sunda pangolin, and many others. This will be a good opportunity to compare wildlife conservation challenges and potential solutions in Sabah and Peninsular Malaysia. More details below and in the attached flyer.

This event is one of Mindset’s Public Talks – monthly events that are generally held on the evening of the third Wednesday of each month. These talks are aimed to a general audience including academics, government officers, NGOs, people from the relevant industries, and any person with an interest for environmental issues. We are looking forward to see you in this and future Mindset events.

Please do join us and share this information with others who might be interested.

Mindset Public Talk, December 2016

Title: Wildlife responses to habitat fragmentation and degradation in the Kinabatangan landscape
Guest Speaker: Dr Benoit Goossens
Date & time: Wed 7 Dec 2016, 6-7:30 pm
Venue: University of Nottingham Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre (KLTC), Level 2, Chulan Tower, No 3 Jalan Conlay, Kuala Lumpur (GPS: 3.149604, 101.716449)
Organizer: Mindset, UNMC Interdisciplinary Centre for Environmental StudiesRSVP: Mon 5th Dec, Praveena.Chackrapani@nottingham.edu.my
Refreshments will be served after the talk
Transport from and back to UNMC will be provided for students who register before Fri 2nd Dec
[To avoid traffic hassle we encourage using public transport. The nearest stations to KLTC are Monorail’s Raja Chulan (11 min walking) and Bukit Bintang (13 min)]

About the Talk

Dr Benoit Goossens will present an overview of the current wildlife research undertaken in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary, eastern Sabah, at the Danau Girang Field Centre (DGFC), that is contributing directly to species conservation and management. For the last eight years, students working at DGFC have been extremely active in developing research programmes on several flagship species including the Bornean elephant, the Bornean banteng, the sun bear, the clouded leopard, the Malay civet, the Sunda pangolin, the proboscis monkey, the slow loris and tarsier, the water monitor lizard, the estuarine crocodile and the reticulated python. A large array of innovative tools has been used, such as satellite collars, infra-red camera traps, conservation drone, land surveys and population genetics. I will review the results produced during the last eight years and highlight their direct contribution to wildlife conservation.

About the Speaker

Dr Benoît Goossens is the Director of the Danau Girang Field Centre in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary, a research and training facility co-managed by Sabah Wildlife Department and Cardiff University. He is also a Lecturer at Cardiff University and he has more than 15 years of experience in the field of conservation genetics, having carried out projects on the population genetics of Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, and Bornean elephant in South-East Asia, giant and red pandas in China, chimpanzees and forest elephant in central Africa, black rhinoceros in Zimbabwe and Kenya. He has published more than 70 scientific papers. Dr Goossens holds a PhD in biology from University of Grenoble, France. His research interests are in conservation biology and the related fields of molecular ecology and behavioural ecology.

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on 2 Nov, 19:11
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Mindset-UNMC

[Mindset Public Talk] Dr Philip Johns – Citizen Science & Conservation

Dear friends and colleagues,

we are pleased to announce Dr Philip Johns, from Yale-NUS, as our guest for November’s Mindset Public Talk. In this talk about Citizen Science & Conservation, Dr Johns will present a case study of smooth otters in Singapore and the role of community and technology in generating useful data to study otters’ behavior. More details below.

This event is one of Mindset’s Public Talks – monthly events that are generally held on the evening of the third Wednesday of each month. These talks are aimed to a general audience including academics, government officers, NGOs, people from the relevant industries, and any person with an interest for environmental issues. We are looking forward to see you in this and future Mindset events.


Mindset Public Talk, November 2016
Title: Citizen Science & Conservation
Guest Speaker: Dr Philip Johns
Date & time: Wed 16 Nov 2016, 6-7:30 pm
Venue: University of Nottingham Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre (KLTC), Level 2, Chulan Tower, No 3 Jalan Conlay, Kuala Lumpur (GPS: 3.149604, 101.716449)Organizer: Mindset, UNMC Interdisciplinary Centre for Environmental Studies
RSVP: Wed 9 Nov, Praveena.Chackrapani@nottingham.edu.myRefreshments will be served after the talk
Transport from and back to UNMC will be provided for students who register before 9 Nov

[To avoid traffic hassle we encourage using public transport. The nearest stations to KLTC are Monorail’s Raja Chulan (11 min walking) and Bukit Bintang (13 min)]


About the Talk

Smooth-coated otters (Lutrogale perspicillata) returned to Singapore a few years ago in response to improving water conditions. An extremely active group of enthusiasts has been following the otters almost daily. Technology and online conventions have grown to the point where people are collecting a large quantity of high quality behavioural data. This presentation discusses the Singapore otters as a case study in the role of community and technology in generating usable data — especially behavioural data — and presents preliminary behavioural analysis of the local otters. The presentation concludes discussing possible future directions of citizen science, including novel directions.

About the Speaker

Philip Johns is an assistant professor in Life Sciences at Yale-NUS College in Singapore. He has studied the social behaviour and evolution of various animals, including praying mantids, spiders, scorpions, termites, and a group of stalk-eyed flies that lives in SE Asia. He has studied the evolution and genetics of mate competition, mate choice, cooperation and altruism, and sexual cannibalism. When he moved to Singapore he became enamoured with the recently returned smooth-coated otters, and has been studying them ever since.

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on 3 Sep, 13:40
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Mindset-UNMC

[Mindset Public Talk] Dr Mathieu Guérin – the history of wildlife conservation in Malaysia

In September we are honored to host a talk by Dr Mathieu Guérin, historian from the National Institute of Eastern Languages and Civilizations, INALCO, in France. Dr Guérin is in Malaysia studying the early stages of the wildlife conservation movement in Malaysia (1930s~1970s). In this talk, Dr Guérin will provide an outsider view to the role of the Game Department (Perhilitan) and the Malaysian Nature Society (MNS) in conservation. More details below.

This event is one of Mindset’s Public Talks – monthly events that are generally held on the evening of the third Wednesday of each month. These talks are aimed to a general audience including academics, government officers, NGOs, people from the relevant industries, and any person with an interest for environmental issues. We are looking forward to see you in this and future Mindset events.

Mindset Public Talk, September 2016

Title: Pioneering Wildlife Conservation in Malaysia – a historian’s perspective
Guest Speaker: Dr Mathieu Guérin
Date & time: Wed 21 Sep 2016, 6-7:30 pm
Venue: University of Nottingham Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre (KLTC), Level 2, Chulan Tower, No 3 Jalan Conlay, Kuala Lumpur (GPS: 3.149604, 101.716449)
Organizer: Mindset, UNMC Interdisciplinary Centre for Environmental Studies
RSVP: Tue 13 Sep, Praveena.Chackrapani@nottingham.edu.my
Refreshments will be served after the talk
Transport from and back to UNMC will be provided for students who register before 13 Sep
[To avoid traffic hassle we encourage using public transport. The nearest stations to KLTC are Monorail’s Raja Chulan (11 min walking) and Bukit Bintang (13 min)]

About the Talk

Southeast Asia is praised for the importance of its biodiversity. While Flora and Fauna of the region are under strong pressure, mostly because of human activities, Malaysia has succeeded in maintaining an important forest cover and sustainable populations of endangered species including large mammals, such as tiger, elephants, or seladang. This achievement has been possible only thanks to a conservation apparatus in the country that was set up during British colonisation and that was developed and improved after Independence.

This talk will present the first findings of a historical research that looks into the early stages of Conservationism in Peninsular Malaysia. It focuses on two major actors of conservation in Malaysia since the 1930s-1940s: the Game Department, now known as Jabatan Perhilitan, and the Malayan Nature Society. It shows how a few British colonists, such as Theodore Hubback, have been very active in preserving Malaysian Forests and Wildlife, and how after Independence, especially in the 1960s and 1970s, the Malaysians have been able to take over the British and developed tools and means of wildlife conservation that are still used today.

About the Speaker

Dr. Mathieu Guérin is Maître de Conférences (Associate-Professor) at the National Institute of Eastern Languages and Civilisation (INALCO) in Paris, where he teaches History of Southeast Asia. He is a member of the Southeast Asia Centre (CASE), a research team under the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), the INALCO and the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS). He currently conducts research on the social history of Cambodian rural societies and on wildlife-human conflicts in Southeast Asia. He authored or co-authored two books and a few dozens of papers mainly on the history of Cambodia, Vietnam and Malaysia. He is presently visiting scholar at the University of Nottingham Malaysian Campus (UNMC).

1609.Mindset

on 10 Jun, 11:47
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Mindset-UNMC

Special Mindset Public Event: Extraordinary Tools for Conservation

In June we are pleased to invite you to a very special event co-organized by Mindset, Copenhagen Zoo, and Aichmi Advisory & ServiceUsing Extraordinary Tools for Conservation. This event will involve presentations from two distinguished speakers: Rob Dietz (author of the acclaimed book Enough is Enough) and Brendan Moyle. The event will conclude with a brief panel discussion and Q&A with the floor. Please note that the schedule is different to regular Mindset Public Events, it will take place on Monday 27th June, from 12:30 to 4 pm, at KLTC, Jalan Conlay (more details below and in the attached flyer).

 

Special Mindset Public Event: Extraordinary Tools for Conservation

Mindset, Copenhagen Zoo, and Aichmi Advisory & Service Joint Event, Jun 2016

Title: Using Extraordinary Tools for Conservation. 

Program:

1:00 pm Welcoming words
1:15 pm Enough is Enough: Building a Sustainable Economy in a World of Finite Resources: Rob Dietz
2:15 pm Introduction to Natural Capital Declaration
2:20 pm Break
2:35 pm Combating Illegal Wildlife Trade: the Legal Trade Option: Brendan Moyle
3:35 pm Panel Discussion

Date & time: Mon 27 Jun 2016, 12:30-4 pm

Venue: University of Nottingham Kuala Lumpur Teaching Centre (KLTC), Level 2, Chulan Tower, No 3 Jalan Conlay, Kuala Lumpur (GPS: 3.149604, 101.716449)

RSVP: Tue 22 Jun, Praveena.Chackrapani@nottingham.edu.my

Transport from and back to UNMC will be provided for students who register before 22 Jun
[To avoid traffic hassle we encourage using public transport. The nearest stations to KLTC are Monorail’s Raja Chulan (11 min walking) and Bukit Bintang (13 min)]

About the Speakers

Rob Dietz grew up in suburban Atlanta during the 1970s and 80s, immersed in the American culture of consumerism. By the time he finished college, he knew that he’d have trouble following the rules of this culture (buy, buy, buy, work, work, work). He has continuously questioned mainstream thinking, and as a result, his career has taken some unusual turns. As a scientist he worked for the US government to support wildlife and habitat conservation. As an activist, he worked for a small non-profit organization to advance a sustainable economic agenda. He was the lead author of Enough is Enough: Building a sustainable economy in a world of Finite Resources, a book about aligning economic practices with environmental realities. He is currently a Project Manager with Farmland LP, a benefit corporation that converts conventional farmland to organic with a goal of managing farms sustainably. Rob has one daughter and lives at CoHo Ecovillage in Corvallis, Oregon where he tries to shut down the computer every once in a while and go outside.

Brendan Moyle is an economist, on a mission to save rare species from extinction. But far from simply creating graphs or crunching numbers, he has travelled the world, tracked smugglers’ routes and had his vehicle shot at- because he spends his days studying understanding the complex black market of illegal trade of wildlife products. He studied for a Bachelor of Science in biology followed by a Masters in Science, before he went on to complete his PhD in economics. He is currently a lecturer at Massey and travels to China twice a year to analyse the black market and help track down those illegally trading tiger products. He also focusses on the illegal ivory and rhino horn trade, and often challenges the established conservation perception of how to deal with illegal wildlife trade by suggesting proactive and dynamic intervention, rather than strict enforcement only.

1606.Mindset.Estraordinary

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MESYM.com is a crowd-sourced platform and a living database for environmental movements in Malaysia. There are many good actions being done out there. Our goal is to bring them together. We connect the green dots.